Tours and Workshops on Saturday, May 24

Voir le texte français ici

Join us throughout the four days of the conference for tours, workshops, and other cultural offerings created for conference participants.  Explore an interest you did not know you had or attend events that correspond to a research interest.

SOLD OUT!  Fashioning Gender: High Heels and the Construction of Femininity a Workshop at the Bata Shoe Museum

Cost: $5.00
Date: May 24, 2014
Time: 10:00 -12:00 PM
Location: Bata Shoe Museum 327 Bloor St West Toronto, ON

Join Elizabeth Semmelhack, Senior Curator, the Bata Shoe Museum, for a behind-the-scenes tour of the museum collection as well as a close analysis of heeled footwear from the 16th century to the present day.

Description: The high heel has become a primary icon of femininity signifying a complicated range of meanings from hypersexuality to female ‘power’.  However when the heel was introduced into Western dress from the Near East in the late 16th century it was first embraced by men and connoted masculinity. This workshop will explore how the shifting meanings of the high heel reflected larger societal changes in the construction of gender. Drawing on the rich collection of the Bata Shoe Museum, Senior Curator Elizabeth Semmelhack will go beyond a simple charting of shifting modes of dress to engage with a wide range of subjects that reveal the nuanced role that dress plays in the construction of gender. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes tour of the museum collection as well as a close analysis of heeled footwear from the 16th century to the present day.

Curatorial Tour of Known through the Body: Contemporary Chinese Women Artists

Cost: Free
Date: Saturday May 24, 2014
Time: 10:30 -11:30 am
Meeting Location:  University Of Toronto Art Centre (University College Building 15 King’s College Circle)

Description:  A Primary Exhibition of the Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival (http://scotiabankcontactphoto.com/), this exhibition foregrounds contemporary Chinese women’s situations and articulates new gender identities informed by the rapid changes in China’s traditional values and social and economic structures.  Each artist creates works that make visible an emerging range of Chinese femininities and offers new models for the contemporary experience of Chinese women.

Participating artists: Chen Zhe, Fang Lu, Ma Qiusha, Ye Funa, Fan Xi, Jin Hua, Li Xinmo, Lei Benben, Chun Hua Dong, and Ladybug Theatre

Curators:  Fu Xiaodong, Zhou Yan, and Matthew Brower

SOLD OUT!  Exhibiting the First Peoples of Canada at the Royal Ontario Museum

Cost:  $11.80
Date: May 24, 2014
Time: 2:00-3:00 PM
Location: Royal Ontario Museum

Join Dr. Trudy Nicks, senior curator (retired) in the Department of World Cultures at the Royal Ontario Museum, for a tour and a curatorial perspective on the challenges and opportunities encountered in exhibiting the histories and cultures of First Peoples in a museum setting.

Description: Created in collaboration with advisors from First Nations and Inuit communities, the Daphne Cockwell Gallery of Canada First Peoples at the ROM features early collectors and collections as well as historical and contemporary art.   The tour will introduce gallery themes and highlights and provide a curatorial perspective on the challenges and opportunities encountered in exhibiting the histories and cultures of First Peoples in a museum setting.  The tour will be led by Dr. Trudy Nicks, senior curator (retired) in the Department of World Cultures at the Royal Ontario Museum.  Dr. Nicks was involved with the initial planning and installation of the Daphne Cockwell Gallery of Canada First Peoples which opened in 2005, and most recently was curator for the new exhibition Sovereign Allies/Living Cultures, a First Nations perspective on the War of 1812-14 and its aftermath.


New Views on Women’s Silk Weaving in Madagascar

Cost:  $11.80
Date: May 24, 2014
Time: 2:00-3:00 PM
Location: Royal Ontario Museum

Join Dr. Sarah Fee, Curator of Eastern Hemisphere Textiles and Costume at the Royal Ontario Museum, for a tour of a new installation of the ROM’s unique collection of 19th century silks from highland Madagascar.

Description: In the 19th century, weaving cloth was an important part of women’s work in the island African nation of Madagascar. Everywhere, women processed fibers and dyes to clothe their families and make ceremonial items. In a few regions, women seized new economic opportunities to become professional weavers. In the highlands in the 19th century, this included the creation of resplendent brocaded silks, dyed in all the rainbow’s hues. Formerly though to be rigid markers of rank or religion, new research suggests these vibrant cloths were personalized expressions, the result of changing geopolitics and consumption patterns in the 19th century Indian Ocean.  The tour will be led by Dr. Sarah Fee, Curator of Eastern Hemisphere Textiles and Costume at the Royal Ontario Museum. Sarah’s recent research focuses on the western Indian Ocean as an integrated space for handweaving and dress.

Visites guidées et ateliers du samedi 24 mai

COMPLET!  Façonner le genre: Talons hauts et construction de la féminité – un atelier au Musée Bata de la chaussure

Coût: 5,00$
Date: le 24 mai 2014
Horaire: 10 :00-12 :00
Lieu: Musée Bata de la chaussure, 327 rue Bloor Ouest, Toronto, ON.

Joignez-vous à Mme Elizabeth Semmelhack, conservatrice en chef du Musée Bata de la chaussure, pour une visite guidée des coulisses de la collection du musée et une analyse approfondie du phénomène du port des chaussures à talons du 16ème siècle à nos jours.

Description: Le talon haut est devenu un symbole central de la féminité revêtant une gamme complexe de significations allant de l’hypersexualisation à la dimension du ‘pouvoir’ de la femme. Toutefois, lorsque le talon a été introduit dans la mode occidentale à partir du Proche-Orient à la fin du 16ème siècle, il a d’abord été adopté par les hommes et associé à la masculinité. Cet atelier explorera la façon dont les changements de signification du talon haut reflètent de plus grandes évolutions sociétales dans la construction du genre. S’appuyant sur la riche collection du Musée Bata de la chaussure, la conservatrice en chef Elizabeth Semmelhack ira au-delà d’une simple cartographie de l’évolution des modes vestimentaires pour mieux explorer le large éventail de sujets qui révèlent le rôle nuancé que joue cet accessoire vestimentaire dans la construction du genre. L’atelier comprendra une visite guidée des coulisses de la collection du musée ainsi qu’une analyse approfondie du phénomène du port des chaussures à talons du 16ème siècle à nos jours.

Visite guidée par la commissaire de l’exposition « Artistes chinoises contemporaines »

Coût: Gratuit
Date: Le samedi 24 mai 2014
Horaire: 10:30-11:30
Lieu de rencontre: University Of Toronto Art Centre (University College Building, 15 King’s College Circle)

Description:  Exposition principale du Festival de photo Scotiabank CONTACT (http://scotiabankcontactphoto.com/), cet événement met en valeur des situations vécues par les Chinoises contemporaines. Les exposantes y précisent les nouvelles identités de genre informées par les changements accélérés apportés aux valeurs traditionnelles et aux structures socioéconomiques chinoises. Chaque artiste crée des œuvres qui font apparaître une gamme émergente de féminités des Chinoises.

Artistes participantes: Chen Zhe, Fang Lu, Ma Qiusha, Ye Funa, Fan Xi, Jin Hua, Li Xinmo, Lei Benben, Chun Hua Dong et Ladybug Theatre

Commissaires:  Fu Xiaodong, Zhou Yan et Matthew Brower

COMPLET!  Les Premières Nations du Canada – Exposition au Musée royal de l’Ontario

Date: le 24 mai 2014
Horaire: 14 :00-15 :00
Lieu: Musée royal de l’Ontario

Joignez-vous à Mme Trudy Nicks, ancienne conservatrice en chef du Département des cultures du monde au Musée royal de l’Ontario, pour une visite guidée et une mise en perspective des défis et des enjeux encourus dans la présentation de l’histoire et des cultures des différents peuples autochtones dans un cadre muséal.

Description: Créée en collaboration avec des conseillers des Premières Nations et des communautés Inuits, la galerie Daphne Cockwell des Premières Nations du Canada au MRO présente autant les premiers collectionneurs et collections que les productions d’art historique et contemporain. La visite guidée vous fera découvrir les thématiques et les points saillants de la galerie en plus d’offrir un aperçu des défis et des enjeux associés à la présentation de l’histoire et des cultures des peuples autochtones dans un cadre muséal.

La visite sera guidée par Mme Trudy Nicks, ancienne conservatrice en chef du Département des cultures du monde au Musée royal de l’Ontario. Madame Nicks a participé à la planification initiale et à l’installation de la Galerie Daphne Cockwell des Premières Nations du Canada inaugurée en 2005 et, plus récemment, a été commissaire de la nouvelle exposition Sovereign Allies/Living Cultures, une perspective des Premières Nations sur la guerre de 1812-1814 et ses conséquences.

Nouvelles perspectives sur le tissage de la soie par les femmes de Madagascar

Date: le 24 mai 2014
Horaire: 14:00-15:00
Lieu: Musée Royal de l’Ontario

Joignez-vous à Mme Sarah Fee, conservatrice de la collection Textiles et costumes du Vieux-Monde au Musée Royal de l’Ontario, pour une visite guidée d’une nouvelle exposition de la collection exceptionnelle de soies du 19ème siècle provenant des hautes terres de Madagascar.

Description: Au 19e siècle, le tissage constituait une part importante du travail des femmes de l’île de Madagascar, en Afrique. Toutes les femmes malgaches transformaient les fibres et fabriquaient des teintures afin de vêtir leurs familles et confectionner des objets cérémoniels. Dans quelques régions, les femmes ont profité de nouvelles possibilités économiques pour devenir tisserandes professionnelles. Dans les hautes terres du 19ème siècle, leur travail comportait la création de brocards en soie resplendissants, teints de toutes les couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel. Même si ces étoffes ont longtemps été tenues pour des rigides indicateurs de rang ou de religion, de nouvelles recherches suggèrent plutôt que ces splendides vibrantes étaient des expressions personnalisées, résultat de l’évolution géopolitique et des habitudes de consommation qui prévalaient alors autour de l’océan Indien.

La visite sera guidée par Mme Sarah Fee, conservatrice de la collection Textiles et costumes du Vieux-Monde au Musée Royal de l’Ontario. Les recherches récentes de Sarah se concentrent sur l’océan Indien occidental comme espace intégré de tissage à la main et de confection de robes.

%d bloggers like this: