Tours, Workshops, and Events @ the Art Gallery of Ontario – Friday, May 23

Voir le texte français ici

On Friday May 23, 2014 the Art Gallery of Ontario becomes a conference hub hosting conference sessions as well as tours and workshops created for conference attendees by museum curators. See a full list below.

Berkshire Conference attendees will also have free admission to the art gallery (permanent collection only) between 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM on Friday May 23.  The AGO is a short 15 minute walk from campus – making it possible to take in a session, tour and/or workshop and return to sessions scheduled on the University of Toronto campus.

Don’t miss this unique and wonderful opportunity! Sign up early as spaces are limited.

ABOUT THE AGO

With a collection of more than 80,000 works of art, the Art Gallery of Ontario is among the most distinguished art museums in North America. From the vast body of Group of Seven and signature Canadian works to the African art gallery, from the cutting-edge contemporary art to Peter Paul Rubens’ masterpiece The Massacre of The Innocents, the AGO offers an incredible art experience with each visit. In 2002 Kenneth Thomson’s generous gift of 2,000 remarkable works of Canadian and European art inspired Transformation AGO, an innovative architectural expansion by world-renowned architect Frank Gehry that in 2008 resulted in one of the most critically acclaimed architectural achievements in North America. Highlights include Galleria Italia, a gleaming showcase of wood and glass running the length of an entire city block, and the often-photographed spiral staircase, beckoning visitors to explore. Visit ago.net to find out more.

To see the conference sessions hosted by the AGO, click here

Art Gallery of Ontario Workshops

SOLD OUT!  Digital History Workshop 2

Cost: $5.00
Date: Friday May 23, 2014
Time: 10:45-12:30 PM
Meeting Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Join Natalie Rothman, Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto for a participant-driven unconference to discuss digital scholarship and its impact on historians, historical studies, and the publics they engage. No technical background or special software required, but bringing your own laptop is highly recommended.

Description:  Digital technology is all-present in our lives, both inside and outside academia. Pundits often tout its profound and transformative impact on how we approach scholarship and scholarly communication, and on the very questions we find worth asking about the past. Yet most historians and history students receive little to no training in the active making and hacking of digital tools, even while recognizing the limitations and ethical problems associated with existing commercial software and scholarly practices. The problem is compounded by the well-noted gender and generational gap in digital literacy.

This workshop aims to foster a productive conversation about the challenges and possibilities of digital history by bringing together practicing digital historians with less tech savvy colleagues for a hands-on, unconference-style workshop, where the agenda will be determined by participants’ interests and unique skills. If you are interested in digital history, have a dream digital project but don’t know how to pursue it, or perhaps have already developed a set of digital resources you’d like to share with others, please join us. No technical background or special equipment (other than your laptop) necessary.   If you’d like to propose specific topics for discussion, if you’re already a practicing digital historian with special expertise, or if you are involved in developing a particular resource you’d like to share, please contact the workshop organizer, Natalie Rothman, by May 1, 2014.

SOLD OUT!  History, Memoir and the Graphic Novel: Depicting a Family’s Migration between Canada and Yugoslavia

Cost: $5.00
Time: 10:45-12:30 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Join Andrew Hunter, the AGO’s Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art, in conversation with Nina Bunjevac about her forthcoming graphic novel Fatherland (Random House, fall 2014) depicting her family’s history of migration between Canada and Yugoslavia.

Description: This workshop, focusing on Nina Bunjevac’s original drawings, provides a unique opportunity for a discussion of the ways graphic novels function as unique and compelling ways to narrate intertwined personal, national and transnational histories. Born in Welland, Ontario, and raised in Yugoslavia, Bunjevac produces highly personal work deeply rooted in her family’s complex history of migration between Canada and Yugoslavia. Her cartoons discuss conflict in the former Yugoslavia, twentieth century nationalist movements, Eastern Europe post-communism and issues of migration and identity.  In her latest project, Bunjevac deals directly with the harsh divisive politics of communism and nationalism in a fractured family and documents her own attempts to piece together an understanding of her father (a well-known Serbian nationalist who died under mysterious circumstances) from mixed messages and fragile memories. While her publication is titled Fatherland, her relationships with her mother, sister and maternal grandmother anchor the narrative.

SOLD OUT!  What Emily Saw: World War I albums in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario

Cost: $5.00
Time: 10:45-12:30 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Join Sophie Hackett, Associate Curator, Photography, AGO, and Adjunct Faculty, Photographic Preservation and Collections Management, Ryerson University, to view and discuss albums of photographs from the World War I era.

Description: By the time World War I broke out in 1914, small handheld cameras had become available that proved very popular with soldiers – the Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic was even marketed as the “soldier’s camera” – who promptly took them off to war.  A collection of 495 albums of photographs from the World War I era, now housed at the Art Gallery of Ontario, constitutes an extraordinary trove of these personal perspectives on the Great War, from all sides of the conflict, British, French, Canadian, German, American, Russian, Polish, among others.

These albums also clearly reveal the important roles women played throughout the war.  In one album dedicated to British nurse Emily Stuart Maxwell, her life and service take shape through a complex collection of photographs, postcards and other ephemera. Originally created for personal consumption and display, and now found in a public institution, this workshop will centre on Maxwell’s album, and others, and consider what it means to bring these albums to light in a museum setting, nearly a century after they were made, and what meaning we can glean from them as objects rich with historical information.

SOLD OUT! Is it Art?: Art in the Archives

Cost: $5.00
Time: 1:00-3:00 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Join Toronto-based artist Iris Häussler (www.haeussler.ca), Dr. Kristina Huneault, Concordia University Research Chair in Art History and founder of the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative (cwahi.concordia.ca), and Georgiana Uhlyarik, Associate Curator, Canadian Art, AGO, and Dr. Amy Furness, Special Collection Archivist, AGO, for an exclusive opportunity to considers the issues and methodologies of researching, collecting, exhibiting and sometimes ‘creating’ the archives of historical and contemporary women artists as works of art.

Description: Bringing together the views and practices of the artist, the academic, the curator and the archivist, this workshop and associated panel addresses the question: is it art?  Attendees will view works of art by celebrated Toronto-based artist Iris Häussler, who creates entire archives of fictitious people to wide acclaim. Also on view will be several notebooks by Canadian artist Betty Goodwin (1923-2008). Goodwin was a collector as much as a creator. Throughout her life, she collected ideas, drawings, along with quotes, objects and photographs in her notebooks, which became her portable studio. Upon her death, Goodwin offered the AGO Special Collections her most important and personal possession, all of her 117 notebooks.

SOLD OUT!  Recovering History: The buried negatives in the Lodz ghetto – photographs by Henryk Ross

Cost: $5.00
Time: 1:30-3:00 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Join Maia Sutnik, Curator, Photography and Special Projects, AGO, to examine and discuss surviving photographs depicting life in the Lodz ghetto between 1941 and 1944 taken by photographer Henryk Ross.

Description:  This workshop provides an opportunity to examine and discuss surviving photographs depicting life in the Lodz ghetto between 1941 and 1944 taken by photographer Henryk Ross (1910-1991).   Ross recorded the daily struggles of the Jewish community in the Lodz ghetto. Many of Ross’s photographs address the labour of women in the textile industries, kitchens and hospitals, and as fecal workers – labour that promised a death sentence from typhus and disease.  These photos provide observations of cruelties and also brief moments of happiness at a time of unspeakable hardships.

During the final liquidation of the population to concentration camps, Ross buried the negatives in the ground in an attempt to save this historical account.  Although many were destroyed by moisture, nearly 3,000 negatives miraculously survive.  These, along with a small group of original prints, newspapers and curfew notices, are now in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

SOLD OUT!  Käthe Kollwitz: Haunting etchings, lithographs, woodcuts and drawings depicting women

Cost: $5.00
Time: 3:15-5:00 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Description: Join Brenda Rix, Assistant Curator, Prints and Drawings, AGO, to discuss major twentieth-century printmaker Käthe Kollwitz’s depictions of motherhood, the loss of the child and the experiences of poor working women.  In 2003 Rix curated the exhibition “Käthe Kollwitz. The Art of Compassion” and wrote the accompanying catalogue.

The workshop looks at the AGO’s large collection of prints by Käthe Kollwitz, major 20th c. German printmaker.  Participants will view a selection of her haunting etchings, lithographs, woodcuts and drawings.  Using key images as case studies the discussion may touch on her approach to historical narrative, her obsession with the self-portrait, motherhood and the loss of a child, and the experiences of poor, working women.  Her subjects were predominantly women, and she was one of the first artists to see working women as “persons of character …fully responsive to the full range of human feelings.”  They became the vehicles through which she explored wide-ranging themes such as love and betrayal, oppression and revolt, grief and comfort, sacrifice and protection, and war and survival.  Examples of her work such as “Outbreak”, “Raped” and “Woman with the Dead Child” or her antiwar series of woodcuts, which includes “Sacrifice”, “Parents”, and “Widow” make one ask what lines Kollwitz crossed in her personal, political and artistic life and what borders were impenetrable?

TOURS

During the Berks Day at the AGO, a number of special tours of the collections and exhibitions will be offered by AGO curators and Toronto artists to conference participants. Explore the works on view with curators and artists who will offer insight and discuss works of art.

SOLD OUT! Women Artists

Cost: $5.00
Time: 3:15-5:00 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Description: Join Toronto-based artist Iris Häussler (www.haeussler.ca), and Georgiana Uhlyarik, Associate Curator, Canadian Art, for a tour of works on display by women artists in the Canadian Galleries. Visit http://www.ago.net/canadian/ to find out more.


Modern and Contemporary Art

Cost: $5.00
Time: 3:15-5:00 PM
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

Description: Join Kitty Scott, Curator, Modern and Contemporary, for a tour of the newly installed Art Gallery of Ontario’s contemporary collection. Visit http://www.ago.net/contemporary/ to find out more.

Visites guidées, ateliers et activités au Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario, le vendredi 23 mai

Le vendredi 23 mai 2014, le Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario (AGO) deviendra un pôle qui accueillera des sessions de la conférence, des visites organisées et des ateliers créés exclusivement pour les participant(e)s par les commissaires du Musée. http://www.ago.net/

Les participant(e)s à la conférence Berkshire bénéficieront aussi d’un droit d’entrée sans frais à l’AGO (collection permanente seulement) entre 10h et 17h le vendredi 23 mai.  L’AGO n’est qu’à 15 minutes de marche du campus – ce qui rend possible d’assister à une session, une visite guidée ou un atelier pour ensuite revenir aux sessions programmées sur le campus de l’Université de Toronto.

Ne ratez pas cette merveilleuse et exceptionnelle occasion! Inscrivez-vous sans tarder car les places sont en nombre limité.

AU SUJET DU MUSÉE DE BEAUX-ARTS DE L’ONTARIO

Avec sa collection de plus de 80 000 œuvres d’art, le Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario est un des musées d’art les plus réputés en Amérique du Nord. Qu’il s’agisse de sa vaste collection du Groupe des Sept et d’autres œuvres clé d’artistes canadiens, de sa galerie d’art africain, d’œuvres contemporaines de pointe ou du chef-d’œuvre de Pierre Paul Rubens, Le Massacre des Innocents, l’AGO offre une expérience artistique incroyable à chaque visite. En 2002, un généreux don par Kenneth Thomson de 2 000 œuvres canadiennes et européennes de premier plan ont inspiré Transformation AGO, une expansion architecturale audacieuse réalisée en 2008 par l’architecte mondialement reconnu Frank Gehry et saluée comme une des grandes réussites architecturales nord-américaines. Le Musée abrite la Galleria Italia, une vitrine incroyable en bois et verre qui fait la longueur d’un pâté de maisons et recouvre la façade du Musée, et un grand escalier en spirale qui invite le public à explorer les galeries. Visitez le site ago.net pour en savoir plus.

Ateliers du Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario

COMPLET!  Atelier d’histoire numérique

Coût: $5.00
Date: Le vendredi 23 mai 2014
Horaire: 10:45-12:30
Lieu:  AGO

Joignez-vous à Natalie Rothman, professeure agrégée d’histoire à l’Université de Toronto pour une non-conférence axée sur ses participant(e)s au sujet de la recherche en technologie numérique et de son impact sur les historien(ne)s, les études historiques et leurs auditoires. Aucune formation technique ou logiciel particulier n’est requis, mais il est hautement recommandé d’amener votre portable.

Description: La technologie numérique est omniprésente dans nos vies, au sein comme à l’extérieur de l’université. Les analystes vantent souvent ses impacts profonds et transformateurs, tant dans notre approche de la recherche et de la communication érudites que dans les questions que nous choisissons de poser au sujet du passé. Pourtant la plupart des historiens et des étudiants en histoire reçoivent peu ou pas de formation sur la création ou le détournement d’instruments numériques, et ce même compte tenu des limites et des problèmes éthiques associés aux logiciels commerciaux et aux pratiques érudites existantes. Ce problème est aggravé par la fracture numérique bien connue de genre et de génération.

Cet atelier souhaite susciter une conversation productive au sujet des défis et des possibilités de l’histoire numérique, en réunissant des historiens numériques pratiquants avec leurs collègues moins habitués à ces techniques pour un séminaire pratique bien différent d’une conférence formelle, où le programme reflètera les intérêts et talents particuliers des personnes présentes. Si vous vous intéressez à l’histoire numérique, que vous avez un projet numérique particulier ou que vous avez déjà créé un ensemble de ressources numériques que vous aimeriez mettre en commun, veuillez vous joindre à nous. Il n’est pas besoin de posséder une formation technique ou un équipement particulier (à l’exception de votre portable).

Si vous aimeriez proposer des projets à discuter, si vous avez déjà une pratique en histoire numérique, ou si vous participez à l’élaboration d’une ressource particulière que vous aimeriez partager, veuillez contacter l’organisatrice de l’atelier, Natalie Rothman, avant le 1er mai 2014.

COMPLET! Histoire, mémoire et roman graphique: Représentation de la migration d’une famille entre le Canada et la Yougoslavie

Coût: 5,00$
Horaire: 10:45 – 12:30
Endroit: Art Gallery of Ontario

Joignez-vous à Andrew Hunter, Conservateur Fredrik S. Eaton en Art canadien de l’AGO, qui conversera avec Nina Bunjevac à propos de son roman graphique à paraître, Fatherland (Random House, automne 2014), qui dépeindra l’histoire de la migration de sa famille entre le Canada et la Yougoslavie.

Description: Cet atelier, consacré aux dessins originaux de Nina Bunjevac, offre une occasion exceptionnelle d’échanger sur les façons dont les romans graphiques arrivent à narrer de façon originale et convaincante des récits personnels, nationaux et transnationaux. Née à Welland (Ontario) et élevée en Yougoslavie, Bunjevac produit des œuvres très personnelles, profondément ancrées dans un vécu familial complexe de migration entre le Canada et la Yougoslavie. Ses dessins s’inspirent des conflits qui ont déchiré l’ex-Yougoslavie, des mouvements nationalistes du siècle dernier, de la période postcommuniste et enfin, de l’Europe de l’Est et des enjeux de migration et d’identité. Dans son plus récent projet, Bunjevac aborde directement l’âpreté de l’antagonisme entre le communisme et le nationalisme dans une famille brisée, en plus de documenter ses propres efforts pour recréer une vision de son père (un nationaliste serbe renommé) à partir de messages ambigus et de souvenirs fragiles. Même si son ouvrage s’intitule Fatherland, ce sont ses relations avec sa mère, sa sœur et sa grand-mère maternelle qui servent d’ancrage au récit.

COMPLET!  Ce qu’Emily a vu : Albums de la Première guerre mondiale de la collection de l’AGO

Coût: 5,00$
Heure: 10:45-12:30
Lieu: AGO

Joignez-vous à Sophie Hackett, commissaire adjointe, photographie, AGO, et adjointe d’enseignement, Préservation photographique et Gestion des collections, Université. Ryerson, pour regarder et discuter d’albums photo de l’époque de la Première guerre mondiale.

Description: Lorsque a éclaté la Première guerre mondiale, en 1914, de petites caméra à main étaient le marché et très populaires auprès des militaires – la Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic était même commercialisée sous le nom de « la caméra du soldat » – et plusieurs d’entre eux l’amenèrent au front. Le Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario est aujourd’hui le propriétaire de 495 albums de photos de cette époque, qui constituent un extraordinaire trésor de ces points de vue personnels de la Grande guerre, issus de tous les protagonistes du conflit : Britanniques, Français, Canadiens, Allemands, Américains, Russes et Polonais, entre autres.

Ces albums révèlent aussi les rôles importants joués par des femmes durant toute la guerre. Dans un album voué à l’infirmière britannique Emily Stuart Maxwell, sa vie et son service prennent forme par le biais d’un complexe assemblage de photos, de cartes postales, et d’autres éphémérides. D’abord créé à des fins d’appréciation et de présentation personnelle, l’album de Maxwell et d’autres se retrouvent aujourd’hui dans un établissement public; l’atelier portera sur ce que signifie le fait de mettre en lumière ces albums dans un cadre muséal, près d’un siècle après leur création, et il envisagera ce que nous pouvons glaner comme sens de ces objets riches de renseignements historiques.

COMPLET! Est-ce de l’art? Art dans les archives

Coût: 5,00$
Heure: 13:00-15:00
Lieu: AGO

Joignez-vous à l’artiste torontoise Iris Häussler (www.haeussler.ca), Kristina Huneault, Chaire de recherche en histoire de l’art de l’Université Concordia, et fondatrice du Réseau d’étude sur l’histoire des artistes canadiennes (cwahi.concordia.ca/fr/), Georgiana Uhlyarik, Commissaire adjointe en Art canadien, AGO, et Amy Furness, Archiviste des collections spéciales, AGO, réunies pour une occasion unique de considérer les enjeux et les méthodes pertinentes à la recherche, la collection, l’exposition et parfois la « création » d’archives du travail d’artistes historiques et contemporaines, en tant qu’œuvres d’art.

Description: Réunissant les points de vue et les pratiques de l’artiste, de l’universitaire, du commissaire et de l’archiviste, cet atelier et le panel qui l’accompagne aborde la question : est-ce de l’art? Les participant(e)s pourront admirer des œuvres de la célèbre artiste torontoise Iris Häussler, acclamée pour sa création d’archives entières de personnes fictives. Seront également exposés plusieurs carnets de notes de l’artiste canadienne Betty Goodwin (1923-2008). Goodwin était tout autant collectionneuse que créatrice. Durant toute sa vie, elle a recueilli des idées, des dessins, des dessins, des citations, de petits objets et des photographies dans des cornets qui devinrent son studio portatif. À son décès, Betty Goodwin offrit aux Collections spéciales de l’AGO sa possession personnelle la plus importante, l’ensemble de ses 117 carnets de notes.

COMPLET!  Recouvrer l’histoire : Les négatifs enfouis du ghetto de Lodz – photographies de Henryk Ross

Coût: 5,00$
Heure: 13:30-15:00
Lieu: AGO

Joignez-vous à Maia Sutnik, Curatrice, Photographie et Projets spéciaux, AGO, pour examiner et discuter les photographies qui nous restent du ghetto de Lodz, prises entre 1941 et 1944 par le photographe Henryk Ross.

Description: Cet atelier offre l’occasion d’examiner et de discuter les photographies dépeignant la vie de tous les jours dans le ghetto de Lodz, prises entre 1941 et 1944 par le photographe Henryk Ross (1910-1991).

Ross y a enregistré les luttes quotidiennes de la communauté juive du ghetto Lodz. Beaucoup des clichés de Ross saisissent le travail des femmes dans les usines textiles, les cuisines et les hôpitaux, et à titre de travailleuses fécales – un travail qui constituait une sentence de mort par le typhus, entre autres maladies. Ces photos sont autant d’observations des moments de cruauté mais aussi de bonheur à une époque d’adversité indescriptible.

Lorsqu’arriva la liquidation finale de la population envoyée dans les camps de concentration, Ross enterra ses négatifs dans le sol afin de tenter de sauver ce compte rendu historique. Même si des moisissures détruisirent la plupart d’entre eux, quelque 3000 négatifs survécurent miraculeusement. Ces pièces font maintenant partie de la collection du Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario, avec quelques tirages originaux, coupures de journaux et avis de couvre-feu.

COMPLET!  Käthe Kollwitz et ses envoûtantes estampes, lithographies, gravures et dessins de femmes

Coût: 5,00$
Heure: 15:15-17:00
Lieu: AGO

Description: Joignez-vous à Brenda Rix, Commissaire adjointe, Gravures et dessins, AGO, pour discuter de la graveuse de premier plan du 20e siècle Käthe Kollwitz et ses illustrations de la maternité, de la perte de l’enfant et du vécu des travailleuses pauvres. En 2003, Rix a réalisé l’exposition « Käthe Kollwitz. The Art of Compassion » et en a rédigé le catalogue.

Cet atelier porte sur l’imposante collection de gravures de Käthe Kollwitz, artiste de premier plan du 20e siècle. Les participant(e)s pourront admirer une sélection de ses envoûtantes estampes, lithographies, gravures sur bois et dessins. Empruntant à des images clés comme cas de figure, la discussion pourra porter sur le traitement kollwitzien du récit historique, son obsession de l’autoportrait, son intérêt pour la maternité et la perte de l’enfant, ainsi que pour le vécu des travailleuses pauvres. Ses sujets étaient surtout des femmes et elle a été parmi les premières artistes à percevoir es travailleuses comme « des personnes de caractère… sensibles à toute la gamme des émotions humaines ». Elles devinrent dans son oeuvre le véhicule d’exploration de thèmes aussi variés que l’amour et la trahison, l’oppression et la révolte, le désespoir et le réconfort, le sacrifice et la protection, la guerre et la survie. À voir certaines de ses œuvres comme « Femme violée » ou « La femme et l’enfant mort » ou sa série anti-guerre de gravures sur bois, dont « Sacrifice ». « Parents » et « Veuve », on se demande quelles frontières Kollwitz a franchies dans sa vie personnelle, politique et artistique et quelles frontières ont pu lui être impénétrables?

TOURS

 Durant la Journée Berks à l’AGO, un certain nombre de visites guidées spéciales des collections et expositions seront offertes aux participant(e)s par les commissaires de l’AGO et par des artistes torontois(e)s. Explorez les œuvres exposées avec ces commissaires et ces artistes qui partageront avec bous leurs intuitions et leurs connaissances de ces œuvres d’art.

COMPLET! Femmes artistes

Coût: 5,00$
Heure: 15:15-17:00
Lieu: AGO

Description: Joignez-vous à l’artiste torontoise Iris Häussler (www.haeussler.ca) et à Georgiana Uhlyarik, Commissaire adjointe, Art canadien, pour une visite guidée des œuvres de femmes artistes exposées dans les Galeries canadiennes. Visitez http://www.ago.net/canadian/ pour en savoir plus.

COMPLET!Art moderne et contemporain

Coût: 5,00$
Heure: 15:15-17:00
Lieu: AGO

Description: Joignez-vous à Kitty Scott, Commissaire, Art moderne et contemporain, pour une visite guidée de la toute nouvelle collection d’art contemporain du Musée des beaux-arts de l’Ontario. Visitez http://www.ago.net/contemporary/ pour en savoir plus.

 

%d bloggers like this: